History Blogs

During this semester, I followed the blogs Boston 1775, Digital Humanities Now, Public History Commons (specifically History@Work), Gettysburg National Military Park, and History of American Women. Each of these blogs related to areas of interest of mine, or areas with

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Art History Blogs

Over the course of the semester I’ve been following several art history blogs. I definitely prefer microblogging to long blog posts. I feel that microblogs post more frequently, and have a much larger variety of information that allows the reader

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On Web sites

So I just got a new Web site up and running for this week’s digital history workset, and I thought I’d post a bit about how this stuff all works. What is this site, exactly? There are several ways of

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Blogs- Keeping the Public Informed

Over the course of the semester, I have been following blogs that cover my own personal historical interests: Ancient World Online (AWOL), Boston 1775, Curator’s Corner, etc. The majority of these blogs posted several times a week regarding new findings,

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Blogging the Renaissance

One of the blogs I’ve been following is Thony Christie’s The Renaissance Mathematicus, dedicated to the history of science – and in particular, Renaissance astronomy. It’s a good example of effective use of the blog as a medium. First of

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Picking and Choosing Blogs

During the semester I followed two blogs, BibliOdyssey and History News Network. The first is an academic blog that looks at historical literature and images while the second is geared towards a more general audience and discusses both historical topics

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Keeping things fresh: blogs in an age of over-publication

I tried to follow a diverse set of blogs this term, related to both my own personal interests and more general historical topics. Generally, all of the blogs I followed were updated regularly with interesting content, and were particularly active

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Blogs – between negligence and palaver

During the semester I followed two blogs, which cover subjects I did some research on: urbanism and the history of psychotropic drugs.   The Old Urbanist is a blog by Charlie Gardner. He breaks down various phenomena of urbanism into pieces short

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Publishing and Sharing Research

In a piece for Debates in the Digital Humanities, Dan Cohen argues that the social contract between author and reader has not easily translated into the digital world. In this social contract, scholars supply the peer-reviewed, edited, and stylized text, and readers recognize this

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Publishing and Sharing Research

All of the sites we had to look at for this week were very well presented. I particularly liked the look of The Valley of the Shadow, but found that one to be slightly difficult to navigate simply because there

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