Blog Archives

Public History Blogs

At the start of the semester I was excited to follow NARAtions, a blog for the National Archives and Oh Say Can You See?, a blog for the Smithsonian Institution of American History. Both are considered prestigious public history institutions, so I

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Final Post

Going through these examples of well done, articulate digital history projects gave hope, yet more concerns for the longevity and practicality of digital history in general. I was especially intrigued by the project created at the University of Virginia. It

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New Media

As much as I support and am excited about the increasing the use (and value) of new media, I remain a little hesitant using visualization techniques throughout the scope of writing (online newspapers, narratives, scholarly articles, etc.), especially if it

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Visualizing Data: Connecting Public and Academic History?

“The world is complex, dynamic, multidimensional; the paper is static, flat. How are we to represent the rich visual world of experience and measurement on mere flatland?” In Envisioning Information, Edward Tufte guides readers in ways to succesfully represent data through graphic design.

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Colonial Williamsburg: Historic Threads

Due to my life-long obsession of Colonial Williamsburg, I decided to do an evaluation of their online exhibit called “Colonial Williamsburg’s Museum Collection- Historic Threads: Three Centuries of Clothing.” You can take a look at the exhibit here.  I honestly

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Digital Storytelling in Museums

The article Digital Storytelling in Museums is something that I firmly believe all museums and institutes need to read, regardless if these places fit the out-dated, objects-behind-glass mold or the so-much-technology-I’m-overwhelmed mold. Wyman et al constructs a very encouraging, but gentle

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Macroanalysis Readings

This week’s readings provided relief to my initial skepticism of utilizing text analysis as evidence for both literary and historical research. All three project the benefits of introducing quantitative methods into literary and historical research, while also confronting issues with

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Benefits and Drawbacks of Text Analysis

While I wouldn’t call myself one of those “most hardened Luddites in literary study” that Ramsay refers to, I do have reservations in utilizing text analysis in historical research. Text analysis adds yet another layer for historians in understanding proper research

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Defining Crowdsourcing

Perhaps the most obvious, yet thought-provoking article we had to read this week was Trever Owen’s The Crowd and The Library. Owens takes a closer look at the definition of “crowdsourcing” and how the business-deviated term doesn’t quite fit in

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Week Three- Data Exposed

This week’s readings primarily focused on the increasing use of data as a new source for historians and the debate behind the use of data. Economists Fogel and Engerman wrote Time on the Cross, which was our central reading, to highlight data

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