Blog Archives

Digital publishing

Edward Ayers’s and William Thomas’s ambitious “The Difference Slavery Made” project from 2003 – and Thomas’s 2007 essay about it – illustrate both the pitfalls of using “new media” for the dissemination of scholarly research but also several good practices. It is

Posted in Uncategorized

On Web sites

So I just got a new Web site up and running for this week’s digital history workset, and I thought I’d post a bit about how this stuff all works. What is this site, exactly? There are several ways of

Posted in Uncategorized

Blogging the Renaissance

One of the blogs I’ve been following is Thony Christie’s The Renaissance Mathematicus, dedicated to the history of science – and in particular, Renaissance astronomy. It’s a good example of effective use of the blog as a medium. First of

Posted in Uncategorized

The (mis)use of ‘new media’

The examples we have looked at this week show varied approaches to so-called ‘new media’, some rather more successful than others. The most straightforward is the Invisible Australians site. This takes an innovative approach to using digital resources – in

Posted in Uncategorized

Data viz

It seems to me that the main issue we’re grappling with in this week’s readings is that of clarity in visual communication. In this respect, Tufte and Drucker lie at opposite poles: Tufte’s work is focused on how to achieve

Posted in Uncategorized

Effective use of digital presentation

The issue of how effectively to present information digitally – what Wyman et al. call “digital storytelling” – turns out to be surprisingly complex. Wyman et al. highlight a number of questions we should ask ourselves, but there are two

Posted in Uncategorized

Distance and time

Melissa’s comments on moving here from Houston and having to adapt to different cultural expectations of time and space are intriguing to me. I also learned to drive in a sprawling Western city – Phoenix – where a 25-mile drive

Posted in Uncategorized

Macroanalysis etc

Matthew Jockers’s Macroanalysis is both fascinating and frustrating. The tools for large-corpus (“macro”) textual analysis he discusses have great potential for historical research; however – as one who is not especially interested in the genre classification of nineteenth-century English novels

Posted in Uncategorized

Missing Maps project

The “crowdsourcing” project I got involved with was the Missing Maps project, part of OpenStreetMap. OpenStreetMap is intended to create a freely available and freely editable (like Wikipedia) mapping project. One of its goals is to map parts of the

Posted in Uncategorized

Data and Shoddy Scholarship – Week 3

I was recently annoyed by a chapter in a textbook on globalization. It’s a brief piece trying to provide some historical context for globalization, and it makes some highly questionable assertions about the origins of globalization in the seventeenth-century Carribean

Posted in Uncategorized