Blog Archives

History Blogs

During this semester, I followed the blogs Boston 1775, Digital Humanities Now, Public History Commons (specifically History@Work), Gettysburg National Military Park, and History of American Women. Each of these blogs related to areas of interest of mine, or areas with

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Stories in New Media

The Guardian‘s “NSA Files: Decoded” and The New York Times’ “Snowfall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek” are examples of how journalists can use new media to enhance a narrative. Piecing each article with new media such as audio clips, video

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Visualizations

This week’s readings emphasized how historians can interpret and adjust visualizations—whether with maps, charts, or graphs—in more meaningful ways. John Theibault explains in “Visualizations and Historical Arguments” that the term “visualization” today “refers to an image that is derived from

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Week 8: Exhibits

This week I looked at some of the online exhibitions on the New York Public Library’s website. As I was browsing through some of the exhibitions I kept some of the suggestions proposed in Bruce Wyman et al.’s “Digital Storytelling

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Week 7 Readings

Spacial history projects and mapping systems like ArcGIS allow researchers to do history in a new way. What tools like ArcGIS can do is give researchers valuable insight into changes and patterns over time by means of visualization. Much like

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Week 6 Readings

Much of this week’s readings fit nicely with last week’s readings in discussing the importance of topic modelling as it applies to historical study. While these readings centered on the use of topic modeling as it can be applied to

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Week 5 Readings

In “Text: A Massively Addressable Object,” Michael Witmore states that “Text is a text because it is massively addressable at different levels and scales.” Witmore interestingly poses the idea that new tools for digital analysis allow for the “massive flexibility

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DIY History

For this week’s crowdsourcing assignment, I explored The University of Iowa Libraries’ DIYHistory site. The DIYHistory site features digitized items from the university’s various archives and collections. The purpose of this “do it yourself” history website is to make its

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Week 3 Post

Lisa Gitelman points out that “data are always ‘cooked’ and never entirely ‘raw’” (7), meaning that numerical evidence cannot be entirely objective. The numerical evidence used within Fogel and Engelman’s Time on the Cross is striking because the “objective” data

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Week 2 Readings

Much like Benjamin seems to lament the diminishing aura or authenticity of art with the rise of film in his article “The Work of Art in the Age of Its Mechanical Reproducibility,” Natalia Cecire warns against ignoring the value of

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