Blog Archives

Publishing and Sharing Research

In a piece for Debates in the Digital Humanities, Dan Cohen argues that the social contract between author and reader has not easily translated into the digital world. In this social contract, scholars supply the peer-reviewed, edited, and stylized text, and readers recognize this

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Stories in New Media

Should this week’s stories be classified as pieces of journalism? With the rise of longform publishing sites over approximately the past five years (Longform, LongReads, and the now defunct Byliner being just a few), more readers have been exposed to

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Interrogating Data Visualizations

Johanna Drucker and John Theibault need to have a conversation. In “Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display,” Drucker heatedly reminds humanists that “realist models of knowledge” posit data as a given, a pre-existent entity waiting to be recorded, organized, and presented

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Reducing the Gaps

Interdisciplinarity has been a buzzword within academia over the past several years. The swell in digital humanities scholarship and projects has inflected the discussion. Drawing upon methods from various disciplines in one’s research and writing remains a key interest for

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Let’s Get “Real”: Exhibits and Digital Storytelling

The Second Story team clearly value storytelling, sensory experiences, and audience engagement. I especially admire their call to flatten the hierarchies that often structure knowledge within museums; by asserting the curatorial expertise through an authoritative voice, museums have too often missed opportunities to enrich

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Mapping and Spatial History

Doing spatial history work strikes me as quite similar to doing many other types of history. Richard White draws attention to the opposite thought – the ways in which spatial history projects use markedly different methodologies to analyze and present

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Data: Taken for Granted No Longer

After finishing this week’s readings, I’m reminded of many of the discussions we’ve had to date in class. Michel et al. address cultural change and linguistic change, reminding their audience that disappearances of words matter as much as their appearance

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Digitization and Texts (Small) Analysis

Much of the debate about the place of digital tools in humanistic work revolves around the process of analysis itself. Many fear that text mining or topic modeling a) alienate words or themes from their context, b) supplant a stream

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Sampling NYPL’s “What’s on the Menu?”

The New York Public Library holds approximately 45,000 menus, dating from the 1840s to the present, in their Rare Books Division. As research interest around the collection increased, curatorial staff sought to make the contents – prices, organization of meals,

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The Meaning Crisis in the Humanities

How will the humanities survive funding cuts, the preoccupation with STEM education, and…the digital turn? The first two concerns have consistently appeared in media and academic debates over the past decade, typically with questions of “societal or economic benefit” or America’s

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