Monthly Archives: December 2015

Some Final Thoughts

As this semester comes to a close, here are a few of my lingering thoughts: I really enjoyed the “Snow Fall” example of digital media and hope to continue to see more of that, and it would be wonderful if

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Following Blogs

I followed quite a few blogs this semester and it ran quite the gamut – some updated almost not at all, some updated with almost daily frequency – but with only pretty pictures and not with any contextual commentary that would

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Public History Blogs

At the start of the semester I was excited to follow NARAtions, a blog for the National Archives and Oh Say Can You See?, a blog for the Smithsonian Institution of American History. Both are considered prestigious public history institutions, so I

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Final Post

Going through these examples of well done, articulate digital history projects gave hope, yet more concerns for the longevity and practicality of digital history in general. I was especially intrigued by the project created at the University of Virginia. It

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Blogs on the HNN

One of the most notable blogs I’ve followed this semester is the Historians/History blog on the History News Network. At the beginning of the semester, I originally questioned if this would be a suitable “academic” blog, as it did resemble many

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The Digital Archive and the Digital Textbook

The Valley of the Shadow got me thinking about the archival turn in the humanities, where concerns of cataloguing, preserving, and digitally marking-up texts represent the overarching questions being asked, and making information readily available – for free – is

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Digital Publishing and Sharing Research

I think as a whole, sharing research in this way, as a website, with the researched topics and thesis categorized and broken down is successful. The way that the authors in both The differences Slavery Made, and Digital history categorize

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Digital publishing

Edward Ayers’s and William Thomas’s ambitious “The Difference Slavery Made” project from 2003 – and Thomas’s 2007 essay about it – illustrate both the pitfalls of using “new media” for the dissemination of scholarly research but also several good practices. It is

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Blog Following Reflection (Working Class Perspectives and Sport in American History)

Of the blogs I followed this semester, Working Class Perspectives, Radical History Network, A Manly Pasttime, Sport in American History, Programming Historian, and Digital Humanities Now, two proved to be useful for me in the long run: Working Class Perspectives

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Digital Publishing

I’ve been interested in the question of publishing and sharing research for some time now. This weeks readings provided some perspectives from the digital humanities on the problem of documenting the process of historical representation and the question of reputation.

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