Monthly Archives: November 2015

Visualizations Readings

This week’s readings dealt with the visualization of data in the humanities and the challenges that are associated with it. In “Visualizations and Historical Arguments,” John Theibault discusses the use of visualizations by historians for the last several centuries. The

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Interrogating Data Visualizations

Johanna Drucker and John Theibault need to have a conversation. In “Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display,” Drucker heatedly reminds humanists that “realist models of knowledge” posit data as a given, a pre-existent entity waiting to be recorded, organized, and presented

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Visualization

Visualization is a tool that has been used in the conveyance of information since we have been able to manipulate the most basic of mediums. The arts, sciences, and humanities, and their respective sub-disciplines, have always used some form of

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Visualizations

This week’s readings emphasized how historians can interpret and adjust visualizations—whether with maps, charts, or graphs—in more meaningful ways. John Theibault explains in “Visualizations and Historical Arguments” that the term “visualization” today “refers to an image that is derived from

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Visualization

Visualizations are more important for some projects than for others. Visualizations for the sake of visualizations do not add anything to the argument, and usually just distract. Johanna Drucker argues that visualizations of this kind should be avoided, that charts,

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Visualizations

The importance of visuals in complementing arguments, and how best to deploy them, is the theme of this week’s readings. But what constitutes an acceptable use of a visualization? In the past, historians were constrained by the technology of their

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Visualizations

In this week’s readings, Johanna Drucker’s “Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display” stands out the most to me, as her call to reassess humanities data as “capta” is quite provocative. Before approaching the phase of creating a visualization, Drucker challenges the

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Visualizations

Johanna Drucker’s argument that data is never a “mere description of a priori conditions” (1) has been widely accepted in our class. Her approach is constructivist and omnipresent in the article: “all data is capta.” Capta frames all represented information as something actively

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Can the visualization speak?

Drucker’s argument of how humanists should use and interpret visualizations of data provides a solid framework for representing the ambiguous and uncertain concepts that undergird literary theory and criticism. However, I struggle to translate her ideas into a plan that can be executed without violating

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Visualization

This week’s readings on data visualization in the humanities have given as a wide array of potential applications, and problems, which arise from the use of pictorial and graphical representations. For the most part, I agree that the use of

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